Are you where you want to be?


1 2 3 10

ISCHIA: Island of Flowers

I am presently enjoying several weeks in my beloved Italy.  There is so much to write about but I think I have to give first place of honor to the Island of Ischia, which sits just off the coast from Naples.  We arrived in Naples, via Rome, on a Thursday evening and after six days catching up with jet-lag, eating LOTS of mozzarella (among many other good Italian dishes!), and going to Bahia Blanca, a favourite beach on the other side of Gaeta, we took the ferry over to Ischia. This is an island formed by volcanic eruptions thousands of years ago.

The first thing that visitors to Ischia notice as the ferry approaches the island is how green and fresh everything is despite the heat.  Because Ischia is a volcanic island it is quite mountainous and its slopes are a rich green as they come down to meet the various towns and villages.  Almost every garden is rich in flowers which at the moment are in full summer bloom.

All of the streets are lined, usually on both sides, with tall rhododendron trees dripping flowers in every shade of pink imaginable.  Bougainvillea in all its many shades spills over walls, climbs fences, and trails up and down the walls of houses as though an artist had dipped many brushes into different colors on his palette and splashed them here and there in wild abandon. Hibiscus offer up their beautiful shallow open trumpets as though about to create some romantic perfumed symphony, and huge pregnant balls of mauve and blue blooms top the stems among the lush green foliage on large hortensia bushes. Everywhere is a riot of color.

But color does not stop with God’s amazing creation.  The residents of Ischia have added their own artistic touch to their island.  Houses are painted in every pastel tint available.  Shops are decorated with colorfully decorated tiles or painted murals and a wild profusion of products hangs in doorways, spills out onto the sidewalks, or fills windows in such a way as to entice the passerby to stop and peruse and, perhaps, buy. My heart and soul are filled with color since being here in Italy and Ischia has played a principal part in that.   


Back in February our church held it’s yearly grand fund-raiser – a silent auction.  The organizing committee really pulled out all the stops and created an incredible evening of fun and entertainment.  Our Fellowship Hall was transformed into something that resembled a New Orleans night club/café.  Sparkling gold, green and purple beads and baubles decorated tall round café tables and stools, and similar colors decorated the walls and the many tables cram-packed with items for the silent auction.

One side classroom held some very yummy food – and plenty of it!  I went back a couple of times because there was just so much to choose from and it was all very appetizing.  (Church ladies sure know how to cook!)  The other side classroom was a fun “ticket auction” area.  You bought a sheet of tickets that all had the same number on and you went round the room looking at the various items displayed and each one had a plastic cup in front of it.  If you liked an item, you tore off a ticket (or more than one) and popped into the cup.   You maintained the stub which carried the same number as the tickets.

Both the silent auction and the ticket auction were closed at the same time.  We had made bids on a few items and were happy to win a couple, especially tickets for a showing of the Peking Acrobats which were dated for our wedding anniversarySmile.  When the results were displayed for the numbers pulled from the ticket auction, we were even more happy to discover that we had won several items including a “Bird/Garden Basket”.  The basket contained several different items including a fun, round, hanging bird house painted bright blue with a straw thatched roof which we hung from a small tree at the back of our yard.

About the same time that I first noticed my Baltimore Oriole, I also noticed a small bird “checking out” the blue bird house.  After observing him a couple of times I identified him as a Carolina Chickadee.  He would sit on the branch that the house hung from and then he’d sit on the peg just below the opening into the house and kind of look in.  Then he’d hop back on the branch.  He did this several times and then he actually put his head inside the opening before hopping back onto the branch. 

This “checking out” continued for several days until one day he brought his mate to check it out too.  They would both pop their heads in and out, then fly back on the branch, then after a while they would fly off.   About a week ago only one of them came but this time he actually went inside the house.  He stayed a few moments then flew off.  This continued for a couple of days and then, as I was sunbathing, I heard this rhythmic tapping coming from inside the bird house.  It went on for a few minutes, then the Chickadee flew out.  He returned another day to do some more tapping.

Finally, two days ago as I was in my early morning quiet time with God, I noticed the Chickadee making repeated fly offs back and forth to the house.  He was most definitely on a mission, flying off then returning about a minute later and going right into the bird house; out again and back a minute later.  So I grabbed the binoculars, watched closely, and realized he was carrying tufts of stuff into the house.  Bingo!  He was nest making.  Since then they have both been back and forth carrying more stuff in to create a soft nest.

Yesterday, while I was out of the house, Richard said he saw an amazing sight.  He had glanced over at the bird house and noticed a squirrel on the branch sniffing out the house.  All of a sudden the two Chickadees appeared and started puffing themselves up, hunching their wings forward and beating them back and forth making a loud whirring noise as they hovered in front of the squirrel.  When that didn’t budge him, they “dive-bombed” him, actually hitting him with their wings, and he finally ran off.

This truly confirmed that we have “guests” in the garden and that they had set up home and were protecting their territory.  We are now looking forward to watching the family form and hopefully we will see the little ones when they begin emerging.  What an amazing creation God has made.   


So, as I said at the end of my last posting,  I waited patiently for my regal visitor, the Baltimore Oriole, to return to to his breakfast spot in my bottle brush tree.  However, it was already day four of his continued absence and I was somewhat heavy-hearted for his loss.  It was later in the day, more like mid-morning snack time than breakfast, when I heard a new call.  At first I thought it was him, but then I realized that this call was richer and the notes kind of tripped over each other.

Grabbing the binoculars I headed out into the garden.  I judged the call to be coming from a couple of houses down and began to play the binoculars back and forth in the direction that it seemed to be coming from.  A sudden flash of scarlet caught my attention in a tree that grew in the pine wood out back immediately behind the fence of the third house to our left.

The calls continued and I kept my eyes focused on the tree.  Suddenly I saw him, a very large, jet-black bird with very distinctive white markings around the face and neck, and a few smaller white markings on the shoulder area of his wings.  But what was striking was the brilliant red crest atop his head.  He was at least as big as the American Crow if not bigger, probably eighteen to twenty inches from head to tip of tail. 

His movements were very unique.  He would lightly run up the trunk and, when he came to a halt, would twist his neck round almost 360* as he pecked at what I presumed were insects.  Or else he would hop out onto a branch and would then hang upside down.  Every once in a while he would stop in these activities and let out his rippling call. He was quite something to see and it made me marvel at the variety of creatures that God has created.

I checked him out in my Kenn Kaufman book of birds and discovered that I was seeing the Pileated Woodpecker.  I was thrilled to read that he is an all-season bird for our region and quite surprised that I had not seen him before.  I have spotted the Red-bellied Woodpecker and also the Red-naped Sapsucker in the pine woods out back, and both are about half the size of the Pileated.  Here is the best picture that Rich could grab of him.  He moved around a lot, but this view of his back clearly shows the white markings and his scarlet crest and also shows how he grips onto the trunk.


And so my knowledge of birds for this area is growing.  Now is definitely the season for bird-watching because they are all in a spring-time frenzy of mating and creating nests.  And that fact will lead nicely into my next posting because we have a pair of Carolina Chickadees who have decided to make their home in our back yard.  I get to be a Grandma one way or another!        

1 2 3 10